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Service Magazines - 11 years (1931-1942)

Price: $19.95

Every radio serviceman who was really serious about keeping up with the rapid changes taking place in the industry needed to subscribe to Service magazine.  As the title implies, the magazine was focused on providing information for the radio service man. The scope of the magazine goes beyond just radio data though.

 

Other topics covered are public address, refrigeration, short waves, phonographs, facsimile, and later, television, and association news. Yes, fax machines in the thirties! Now you can browse through 136 issues of the magazine on disc.

 

The magazines have been scanned, cleaned up with Adobe Photoshop, and saved in .pdf format.

 

The set consists of 2 DVDs. Each DVD has an autostart menu that pops up on your monitor when the disc is placed in your drive. Click on a button on the menu and Adobe's Acrobat Reader (included on the disc) starts up and displays the pages of one of the magazines.

 

Navigate through the magazine, read what you want, print what you want, then close the reader to reveal the menu again, and jump to the next magazine. It's both easy to use and quick.

 

History

Service magazine was first published in August of 1931 by John F. Rider Publications of New York City. Then, in October of 1933, the task of publishing was transferred to the Bryan Davis Publishing Co., Inc, also in New York City.

 

Service magazine, as the title implies, was focused on providing information for the radio service man. The scope of the magazines goes beyond just radio data though. Other topics covered are public address, refrigeration, short waves, phonographs, facsimile, and later, television, and association news. Yes, fax machines in the thirties!

 

I think you'll like the old ads as well as the articles and data. For instance: Did you know that some manufacturers of electrolytic capacitors switched to wood instead of steel for the ends of their capacitors to help conserve materials for the war effort?  You may have had to replace a capacitor with a wooden end and nut and wondered why such an unusual product was used.

 

Even if you don't repair old radios, it's interesting to browse through the magazines and look at the advertising and read the radio repairman's association news to get a view of history not told in history books. One thing that surprised me was the use of sex in advertising back then. I didn't realize society back in the 30's tolerated that, and in a technical magazine yet. There aren't many, only about 1 or 2 a year, but the drawings of women are superb!

 

Here are some article categories (from the index for 1942):

  • Antennae (news of changes in the electronic field)
  • Auto Radio (schematics, troubleshooting, etc.)
  • Book Reviews
  • Case Histories (problems and fixes for popular receivers submitted by subscribers)
  • Charts (pilot lamp characteristics, battery comparisons, etc.)
  • Cover Diagrams (discussion of a circuit depicted on the cover of the present issue)
  • Dials
  • Editorials
  • Electronic Applications (speed regulators, hearing aids, etc.)
  • Features (a Cathode-Ray Oscillograph for the Service Man, Crosley WLW Audio Amplifier, etc.)
  • Frequency Modulation (discusses various new models)
  • Helps (speaker cone replacement tricks, electrolytic terminals, etc.)
  • Hum (servicing power supplies, Silvertone 7025 hum bucking, etc.)
  • Motors (rim drive phono motors, phono motor repairs, etc.)
  • Noise (study of wave traps, tube noises, etc.)
  • On the Job (tricks of the trade, broken dial cords, etc.)
  • Parts (parts tolerances, prolonging condenser life, etc.)
  • Phonographs, Pickups, Record Players, Etc. (Many models featured!)
  • Public Address (components, recommendations, etc.)
  • Receivers (schematics of circuits, new developments, etc.)
  • Recording (railroad sound???, Wilcox-Gay A-103, etc.)
  • Relays (industrial electronics, etc.)
  • Sound (output stage oscillation, microtube hearing-aid circuits, acoustic feedback, etc.)
  • Test Equipment (schematics, uses of, improvements in, etc.)
  • Television (color television [in 1942???], transmission, etc.)
  • Tubes (new developments, industrial, mini, characteristics, etc.)
  • Tuning Indicators, Tuning Mechanisms (various models, dial drive repairs, Colpitts Oscillator, etc.)
  • Wartime Servicing (solving shortage problems)

As you can see, there is an incredible amount of information in these magazines.

Summary

You get 2 DVDs containing scans of 136 magazines from 1931 to 1942. 

Key Benefits of Service Magazines

  •  The schematics and troubleshooting articles will supplement Riders schematics.
  •  The ads in each issue are an education in themselves. 
  •  You'll gain an understanding of the development of the radio industry.
  •  Case Histories of various receivers are discussed with readers contributing their experiences, tips, tips, and tricks in repairing them.
  • Good solid information about receivers that you can really use.

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